Bobskater - A Python obfuscation Library

Using: pythonv3.5

Recently I had the need to obfuscate/minify some Python files before I distributed them. Coming from the Javascript world of ES6 where transpilers and processors are plentiful, I figured there would be a mature, well maintained library similar to UglifyJS in the Python ecosystem. It turns out that this isn't the case.

I decided to code and package my own, called bobskater. It turned out to be surprisingly easy with Python's ast library, the invaluable documentation at GreenTreeSnakes, and a little library called astunparse. Being completely AST based, it won't die on weird syntax or

Cubecus for Blender is here!

Cubecus is here! After a long time coming (4 years on and off), I've gotten my Blender level design add-on into a releasable state (even though in alpha and with some glitches). Don't worry though! It's going to get better with more releases where I plan to separate out the obfuscator it uses into a separate project and add more features and fixes.

If you're unfamiliar, give it's page a look. It explains about the different tools it adds and provides screenshots of use (like the one below).

I hope that everyone who's asked about it and even those who've

Importing and Reloading Python Modules in Blender

Using: blenderv2.7 pythonv3.5

Python in Blender can be tiring. A simple problem becomes an arduous trek through docs, examples, and sometimes the C API to find the Blender way to write given Python code. This is due to the many quirks of Blender's own internal Python environment.

Importing is one of those arduous tasks. Python provides a lot of functionality to import all different kinds of source and data files but Blender's implementation makes design decisions that create issues. This is my deep dive into Blender's Python import integration where at the end I provide a

Compiling Blender as a Python Module for Windows 10 x64 using Visual Studio

Using: blenderv2.78 pythonv3.4 or v3.5

If you want to do unit tests of Blender Python code, it might be to your benefit to not startup Blender every time you want to run them but to just import Blender as a Python module and run them from the command line. This is especially important/nice if you want to automate your tests. Note, before you jump in, if you just need mathutils you can get that separately here.

Luckily, Blender's build has a nifty feature by which you can compile it as a Python module and

Projected Balance Calculator Pt Deux

I updated the balance projection calculator thingy a week or so ago but I thought I'd write about it. Here's a demo image

Graph of > 1 year worth of financial transaction projections. The blue graph represents the balance, the orange represents balance with a savings percentage (in this case %30), and the green represents the total amount possible to spend without hitting 0.

New features include:

  • Filled graph with colors for extra spice
  • Multiple graphs including maximum possible expenditures and savings percentages
  • Labels to show exactly what charges come out when (using a given label when setting up the